Before You Begin Your Kitchen Design

Do you feel cramped when it comes to large cooking projects? Do you find that you just don’t have enough space to store your kitchen gear? Or maybe you’re looking to turn your space into a real chef’s paradise with professional accouterments. If any of these apply to you, it may be time to consider a major renovation in your kitchen. Design trends change by the hour, and it is important to examine your use, personal style, and needs before you can begin planning for your kitchen. Here are a few pointers to guide you in the right direction.

-Money This one is obvious. Establishing your budget ahead of time will help you avoid overspending and keep you grounded throughout the planning process. However, try to leave a little wiggle room so you won’t break your bank in case unforeseen expenses arise.

-What’s your style? What do you like and dislike about your current kitchen design? What are your habits? Are you constantly preparing large meals for potlucks, school, or church? If so, you might some consider industrial-grade additions that can keep up with you and your cooking. Extending a countertop a few inches to create a bar may be the key to adding the extra seating you want if you want if you’re big on entertaining. Asking these questions can help you see the big picture when you’re feeling unfocused.

-Real-life functionality: Be realistic about what you need and don’t need. No matter how gorgeous and expensive it is, there is no point in having a beautiful kitchen that you can’t actually use, also avoid going overboard and spending too much for appliances or materials that aren’t worth it. Use magazine clippings for inspiration, but know that you don’t have to copy anyone’s kitchen design-including Martha Stewart or Oprah-to the letter for it to work for you. At the end of the day, neither of them has to cook in your space. Or pay your bill.

-Planning ahead: Finding a versatile kitchen design that works with your family members at all stages of life is an important consideration when you have decided to settle into a “forever home”, have children, or are affected by any type of disability. Thinking about the future can make a big difference in the long-term usefulness of your kitchen. Examples include: installing larger faucet handles that don’t require gripping or wrist twisting to turn, or removing obstacles and widening aisles to fit walkers or wheelchairs.

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